Honorary members of the Institute
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Richárd Wiegandt (b. 1932, at the Institute since 1964) Doctor of Science (1975).

He works in algebra with a main interest in rings and radicals. He is one of the founders of general radical theory going beyond algebraic structures.







Miklós Ajtai (1946-) External member of the Academy

His main fields of interest are theoretical computer science, mathematical logic and combinatorics. He has achieved several breakthroughs in the theory of randomized algorithms, mostly jointly with J. Komlós and E. Szemerédi. At the Institute between 1970 and 1985, he presently works at IBM Almaden Research Center.

József Beck (1952-) Doctor of Science (1993)

Invited speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians (Berkeley, 1986). A leading expert on uniform distribution and discrepancy theory, he is the author of Irregularities of Distribution (with W. L. Chen, Cambridge University Press, 1987). Probably his best known result is his 1993 solution of an old conjecture on uniform distribution on the k-dimensional torus. He has also done important work in game theory. At the Institute between 1977 and 1984, he is currently Harold Martin Chair Professor at Rutgers University.

Béla Bollobás (1943-) External member of the Academy

A worldwide recognized expert in combinatorics. He is the author and editor of numerous books, including authoritative texts on Combinatorics, Modern Graph Theory and Random Graphs. A regular visitor to the Institute, he is currently a professor at the University of Memphis, Tennessee.


László Csirmaz (1951-)

His research interest is in logic and computer science. After a period at the Institute between 1975 and 1996, he is now head of the Computer and Statistics Center at Central European University.



Miklós Csörgő (1932-) External member of the Academy

He is interested in fine analytic path properties of stochastic processes, Wiener, empirical, local time and released processes. He is author and co-author of five books, among which Strong Approximations in Probability and Statistics, written jointly with Pál Révész, is a frequently cited fundamental work in the subject. He is currently a professor at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada.

Péter Frankl (1953-) External member of the Academy

His main field of interest is combinatorics. He has proven fundamental results in the theory of extremal hypergraphs. Excellent juggler, a TV personality in Japan. He worked at the Institute between 1976 and 1980 and is now at the University of Tokyo.

József Fritz (1943-) Corresponding member of the Academy, Academy Award (1984)

His main field of interest is mathematical physics. He has obtained fundamental results on differential equations with infinite degree of freedom (jointly with R. L. Robinson), and for infinite dimensional stochastic differential equations. He has students at various places around the world. After working at the Institute between 1967 and 1993, he is now a professor at the Technical University of Budapest.


Kálmán Győry (1940-) Member of the Academy, Academy Award (1992), Széchenyi Prize (2002)

He is the initiator in Hungary of the study of diophantine equations and the leader of the Debrecen number theory school. He has achieved important results in applying Baker’s method in transcendental number theory to finding effective bounds on the solutions of diophantine equations. He is a professor at the University of Debrecen, where he also served as Dean and Rector.



András Hajnal (1931-) Member of the Academy, State Award (1970), Academy Award (1967); Director of the Institute (1983–1992).

Invited speaker at the 1974 International Congress of Mathematicians. With Paul Erdős, Attila Máté and Richard Rado, he is the founder of combinatorial set theory and with P. Hamburger the author of a standard textbook on set theory. The Hungarian set theory school gained world fame under his leadership. He worked at the Institute between 1970 and 1992 and is currently a professor at Rutgers University where he also served as director of DIMACS.

Gábor Halász (1941-) Member of the Academy, Erdős Prize (1976)

A prominent expert in analytic number theory, he has obtained fundamental results concerning mean values of multiplicative arithmetic functions. He has also worked in approximation theory and complex analysis and has an impressive list of students. After spending the period 1964-1986 at the Institute, he is now a professor at Eötvös University.

János Horváth (1924-) External member of the Academy

An expert in functional analysis and operator theory, he is the author of an influential 2-volume monograph on Topological Vector Spaces and Distributions. He is currently professor emeritus at the University of Maryland.


Jerry L. Kazdan (19??-)

Working on the interface of the theory of partial differential equations and differential geometry, he has obtained fundamental results (jointly with F. Warner) on the characterisation of curvature functions on 2-manifolds. He is a professor at the University of Pennsylvania and at Central European University.

János Kollár (1956-) External member of the Academy

Invited speaker at the 1990 International Congress of Mathematicians. Working mainly in algebraic geometry, he is a leading authority on the classification of higher dimensional varieties. Together with Miyaoka and Mori, he initiated the study of rationally connected varieties. He is the author of the important monographs Shafarevich Maps and Automorphic Forms (Princeton, 1995), Rational Curves on Algebraic Varieties (Springer, 1996) and Birational Geometry of Algebraic Varieties (with. S. Mori, Cambridge, 1998) and is editor of Inventiones Mathematicae. Currently he is a professor at Princeton University and a regular visitor to the Institute.



János Komlós (1942-) External member of the Academy

His areas of interest include probability theory, the theory of algorithms and graph theory. He is well known among others, for the "KMT embedding" in probability theory (joint work with Major and Tusnády), or for the AKS sorting network. At the Institute between 1967 and 2001, he is now a professor at Rutgers University.


János Körner (1946-)

His main fields of interest are information theory and combinatorics. His book Information Theory written jointly with Imre Csiszár was the first overview of multiuser information theory. He has strongly contributed to combinatorical applications of information theory, in particular he introduced the concept of graph entropy. After a period at the Institute between 1970 and 1996, he is now a professor in Rome.

Miklós Laczkovich (1948-) Member of the Academy, Academy Award (1991), Széchenyi Award (1998)

His main research area is real analysis. Among other fundamental results, he has verified A. Tarski’s conjecture about "squaring the circle". He is a professor at Eötvös University and has been a visiting researcher at the Institute several times.





László Lovász (1948-) Member of the Academy, State Award (1985), Wolf Prize (1999)

He is one of the leading experts of the world in his major areas of research: combinatorics, graph theory and theoretical computer science. He has settled several famous questions in combinatorics like the Shannon capacity problem, the perfect graph conjecture, or the Kneser conjecture. His book Combinatorial Problems and Exercises is a standard text and reference in the field. Beyond his theoretical work he is a very active and productive organizer of the Hungarian and international mathematical community. He is a professor at Eötvös University and at Microsoft Research.

Mihály Makkai (1939-) External member of the Academy

A worldwide recognized, leading researcher in logic and the foundations of mathematics. He has made fundamental contributions to model theory and is one of the founders of categorical logic. He is a professor at McGill University, Montreal, Canada.






Péter Pál Pálfy (1955-; Deputy Director, 1991–1996) Doctor of Science (1997), Mathematical Award (1993)

His research interests are in group theory and universal algebra. His most cited results include the classification of minimal algebras and the determination of finite groups with the general Cayley isomorphism property. After twenty years spent at the Institute from 1980, he is now a professor at Eötvös University.



Pál Révész (1934-) Member of the Academy, State Prize (1978)

He has obtained important results for local time, random walks and empirical processes in probability theory. Recently, he has also been interested in Wiener processes. Jointly with Miklós Csörgő, he wrote the fundamental book Strong Approximations in Probability and Statistics. After a period at the Institute between 1964 and 1985, he is now a professor emeritus at the Technical University of Vienna.

András Sárközy (1941-) Corresponding member of the Academy, Academy Award (1992).

His main areas of interest are additive and combinatorial number theory. Probably his most famous result is that the difference set of a dense sequence of integers always contains a perfect square. A researcher at the Institute between 1971 and 1994, he is now a professor at Eötvös University.






Tamás Schmidt (1936-; Deputy director, 1971–1990) Doctor of Science (1969),

His main area of research is lattice theory and universal algebra. His most celebrated result is a joint theorem with G. Grätzer stating that every algebraic lattice is isomorphic to the congruence lattice of an algebra. After a long stay at the Institute between 1958 and 1990, he is now a professor at the Technical University of Budapest.

Bálint Tóth (1955-) Doctor of Science (1999), Mathematical Award (1995), Academy Award (2003).

Invited speaker at the third European Congress of Mathematics, 2000. His main areas of research are probability theory and stochastic processes. His major results are limit theorems for random walks with long memory exhibiting anomalous diffusion and the construction of the so-called `true self-repelling motion’, a stochastic process with striking analytic and phenomenological properties. After a period at the Institute between 1983 and 1998, he is now a professor at the Technical University of Budapest.



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